Dancing on a laser beam

A graffiti artist enters an old industrial building. With the help of a stencil and a Bosch Quigo, he sprays a figure on a wall. But the laser line works its magic, and the figure develops a life of its own – and gets away from its creator. Will he catch it?

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How do you bring a stenciled figure to life?

How do you bring a stenciled figure to life?

The makers of the “Walk like a stencil” film provide a glimpse behind the scenes.

How do you bring a stenciled figure to life?

The makers of the “Walk like a stencil” film provide a glimpse behind the scenes.

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Making of

Graffiti art comes to life

In the film, a piece of graffiti is brought to life with a Quigo laser line. In total, 294 stencils were needed for the film “Walk like a stencil.”

As Timo Peiseler, the art director of “Walk like a stencil” explains, what he wanted to convey in the film was the idea of making the world more beautiful. “This encompasses both the Quigo and street art,” he says. After all, in street art, the use of stencils is becoming increasingly popular among graffiti artists. Just like DIY enthusiasts decorating their homes, graffiti artists emblazon stenciled images on public areas. One of the most famous of these is the English street artist Banksy. “These artists often have no artistic training – which is why they use stencils to help them,” adds Sascha Haas, Peiseler’s colleague at Stuttgart’s V4 agency. Stencils thus have another parallel with the Quigo – with the right tools, even amateurs can work professionally.

Together, Haas and Peiseler looked for an old factory where the Quigo and a spray-painted stenciled figure would play the starring role.

In “Walk like a stencil,” they wanted the laser line to be more than just a tool – they wanted it to have an active role. “The line brings the wall to life,” says Haas. “It’s what allows the figure to move.”

They quickly settled on the idea that there should be a chase between the artist and his work – and that the Quigo laser line would help. To make the figure move, Haas and three of his staff photographed real people in the appropriate poses in front of a blue wall and then cut these out digitally. Some 294 stencils were needed to ensure the figure’s movements appeared authentic throughout the film. The graffiti artist was filmed live in the building, then everything was cut together afterward. The four-man team worked on the film for two months. “That means if you wanted to do it on your own at home, it would take you a year,” says Haas. Still, it’s theoretically possible.

Graffiti comes to life
Graffiti comes to life