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Christoph Schelling, Dr.

Microsystems - senses for technology & technology for senses - for mobility, mobile assistants, and the internet of things and services

"The understanding of complex root cause-and-effect chains and the creative application of emerging technologies safeguards the competitive advantage for Bosch and enables reliable and innovative "technology for life"."

Christoph Schelling, Dr.

Together with my team at Bosch Research and the colleagues in the business unit Automotive Electronics development, I work on a better understanding of our future microsystems and their production processes. With our technology, we can demonstrate high-precision micro- and nanostructures from thin films down to the monolayer level in the research cleanroom. This level of precision is mandatory for the reliable operation of today's smart, high-performance, optical and mechanical microsystems.

Curriculum vitae

Bosch Research, Innovative MEMS-Technology

2011
Senior Expert for MEMS Technology, 2012 - Inventor of the Year in Bosch Research

Automotive Electronics, Quality Management

2006
Senior Expert for Degradation Mechanisms and Reliability of Semiconductor Devices

Automotive Electronics, Sensor Technology Center

2001
Development of Wafer Processes for Series Production

Selected publications

  • Micromechanical structural element having a diaphragm and method for producing such a structural element

    Matthias Fuertsch et al. (2006)

    Micromechanical structural element having a diaphragm and method for producing such a structural element
    • Matthias Fuertsch, Stefan Pinter, Heribert Weber, Frank Fischer, Lars Metzger, Christoph Schelling, Frieder Sundermeier
    • US Patent 7148077
  • A novel micromachining process for the fabrication of monocrystalline Si-membranes using porous silicon

    Simon Armbruster et al. (2003)

    A novel micromachining process for the fabrication of monocrystalline Si-membranes using porous silicon
    • S Armbruster, F Schafer, G Lammel, H Artmann, C Schelling, H Benzel, S Finkbeiner, F Larmer, R Ruther, O Paul
    • TRANSDUCERS '03. 12th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems. Digest of Technical Papers (Cat. No.03TH8664), Boston, MA, USA, 2003, pp. 246-249 vol.1
    • doi: 10.1109/SENSOR.2003.1215299
  • Micromechanical component and corresponding method for its manufacture

    Frank Reichenbach et al (2010)

    Micromechanical component and corresponding method for its manufacture
    • F Reichenbach, F Laermer, S Kronmueller, C Schelling, C Leinenbach
    • US Patent 7,834,409
  • Next generation pressure sensors in surface micromachining technology

    Gerhard Lammel et al. (2005)

    Next generation pressure sensors in surface micromachining technology
    • G Lammel, S Armbruster, C Schelling, H Benzel, J Brasas, M Illing, R Gampp, V Senz, F Schafer, S Finkbeiner
    • The 13th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, 2005. Digest of Technical Papers. TRANSDUCERS '05., Seoul, South Korea, 2005, pp. 35-36 Vol. 1
    • doi: 10.1109/SENSOR.2005.1496352
  • Micromechanical diaphragm sensor having a double diaphragm

    Matthias Illing et al. (2011)

    Micromechanical diaphragm sensor having a double diaphragm
    • Matthias Illing, Heribert Weber, Christoph Schelling, Heiko Stahl, Stefan Weiss
    • US Patent 7,863,072
  • Sensor element with trenched cavity / Sensor element with trenched cavity

    Hubert Benzel et al. (2008)

    Sensor element with trenched cavity / Sensor element with trenched cavity
    • Hubert Benzel, Stefan Finkbeiner, Matthias Illing, Frank Schaefer, Simon Armbruster, Gerhard Lammel, Christoph Schelling, Joerg Brasas
    • US Patent 7,354,786
  • MEMS device having a microphone structure, and method for the production thereof

    Christoph Schelling et al. (2016)

    MEMS device having a microphone structure, and method for the production thereof
    • C Schelling, S Singer, J Zoellin
    • US Patent 9,403,670
  • Micromechanical sensor

    Hubert Benzel (2007)

    Micromechanical sensor
    • H Benzel, F Schaefer, C Schelling
    • US Patent 7,213,465
  • Kinetic Growth Instabilities on Vicinal Si(001) Surfaces

    Christoph Schelling et al. (1999)

    Kinetic Growth Instabilities on Vicinal Si(001) Surfaces
    • Christoph Schelling, Gunther Springholz, F. Schäffler
    • Physical Review Letters 83(5):995-998
  • On the microscopic origin of the kinetic step bunching instability on vicinal Si(001)

    J Mysliveček et al. (2002)

    On the microscopic origin of the kinetic step bunching instability on vicinal Si(001)
    • J Mysliveček, C Schelling, F Schäffler, G Springholz, P Šmilauer, J Krug, B Voigtländer
    • Surface Science 520(3):193-206

Interview with Christoph Schelling, Dr.

Senior Expert for MEMS Technology

Please tell us what fascinates you most about research.
The creative freedom to bring in and drive one's own ideas thereby shaping a small part of the Bosch future adds that special extra spice.

What makes research done at Bosch so special?
The scientific, interdisciplinary work in a creative team of highly qualified, brilliant minds on demanding and challenging topics is a constant source of motivation and inspiration. The impossible suddenly becomes possible in this environment.

What research topics are you currently working on at Bosch?
I ponder how we can further improve our microsystems in order to make them even more reliable and precise in future. For example, I look into the question on how to produce the structures even more precisely. Recently, we have been able to prove that the production tolerances of the structures can be reduced down to the level of a few hundred atoms. This is a quantum leap in process technology!

What are the biggest scientific challenges in your field of research?
Microsystems are an ever recurring challenge. You think that you have understood a microsystem thoroughly, but every now and then you will experience a surprise. The understanding of aging phenomena and root-cause-and-effect chains is not yet as thorough as in the highly standardized microelectronics, for example. Degradation requires multidomain knowledge from several disciplines (mechanics, electrostatics, chemistry, ...).

How do the results of your research become part of solutions "Invented for life"?
I work closely together with colleagues from the business unit Automotive Electronics in order to leverage our research results early and directly into products. Those products support many aspects of our daily lives, from safety to comfort.

Christoph Schelling, Dr.

Get in touch with me

Christoph Schelling, Dr.
Senior Expert for MEMS Technology

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