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Nadezda Fomina

Technologies for Medical Diagnostics – Invented for Life

"Most people say that it is the intellect which makes a great scientist. They are wrong: it is character." – Albert Einstein

Nadezda Fomina

I am a synthetic polymer chemist with a background in developing "smart" materials for drug delivery. Currently, I am a Lead Scientist in the Bioelectronics Group. Our team develops new technologies for next-generation medical diagnostics, especially for point-of-care applications. Our vision is to revolutionize healthcare by combining state-of-the-art engineering solutions in MEMS sensors, circuit design, and wireless communication, with biochemistry.

Curriculum vitae

Scientist in Bioelectronics Group, Bosch Research and Technology Center

2012-present
Novel technologies for medical diagnostics

Postdoctoral researcher, University of California, San Diego

2007-2012
Stimuli-responsive materials for controlled drug delivery

PhD, University of Southern California

2004-2009
Studies of physico-chemical properties of conjugated polymers

Selected publications

  • Methods for generating pH/ionic concentration gradient near electrode surfaces for modulating biomolecular interactions

    Johnson, C. et al. (2018)

    Methods for generating pH/ionic concentration gradient near electrode surfaces for modulating biomolecular interactions
    • Christopher Johnson, Sam Kavusi, Rajan Gangadharan, Piyush Verma, Nadezda Fomina, Habib Ahmad, Lau I Aldrich
    • US9874538
  • An electrochemical platform for localized pH control on demand

    Fomina, N. et al. (2016)

    An electrochemical platform for localized pH control on demand
    • N Fomina, CA Johnson, A Maruniak, S Bahrampour, C Lang, RW Davis, S Kavusi, H Ahmad
    • Lab on a Chip, vol 16(12), pp. 2236-2244
  • Low power upconverted near‐IR light for efficient polymeric nanoparticle degradation and cargo release

    Vigel, M. et al (2013)

    Low power upconverted near‐IR light for efficient polymeric nanoparticle degradation and cargo release
    • Mathieu L Viger, Madeleine Grossman, Nadezda Fomina, Adah Almutairi
    • Advanced Materials, vol 25(27), pp.3733-3738
  • Single UV or Near IR triggering event leads to polymer degradation into small molecules

    De Gracia Lux, C. et al. (2012)

    Single UV or Near IR triggering event leads to polymer degradation into small molecules
    • Caroline de Gracia Lux, Cathryn L McFearin, Shivanjali Joshi-Barr, Jagadis Sankaranarayanan, Nadezda Fomina, Adah Almutairi
    • ACS Macro Letters, vol 1(7), pp. 922-926
  • Biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles degrade and release cargo in response to biologically relevant levels of hydrogen peroxide

    De Gracia Lux, C. et al. (2012)

    Biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles degrade and release cargo in response to biologically relevant levels of hydrogen peroxide
    • Caroline de Gracia Lux, Shivanjali Joshi-Barr, Trung Nguyen, Enas Mahmoud, Eric Schopf, Nadezda Fomina, Adah Almutairi
    • Journal of the Americal Chemical Society, vol 134(38), pp. 15758-15764
  • Photochemical mechanisms of light-triggered release from nanocarriers

    Fomina, N. et al. (2012)

    Photochemical mechanisms of light-triggered release from nanocarriers
    • N Fomina, J Sankaranarayanan, A Almutairi
    • Advanced drug delivery reviews, vol 64(11), pp.1005-1020
  • Increasing materials' response to two-photon NIR light via self-immolative dendritic scaffolds

    Fomina, N. et al. (2012)

    Increasing materials' response to two-photon NIR light via self-immolative dendritic scaffolds
    • Nadezda Fomina, Cathryn L McFearin, Adah Almutairi
    • Chemical Communications, vol. 48(73), pp.9138-9140
  • Low power, biologically benign NIR light triggers polymer disassembly

    Fomina N. et al. (2011)

    Low power, biologically benign NIR light triggers polymer disassembly
    • Nadezda Fomina, Cathryn L McFearin, Marleen Sermsakdi, José M Morachis, Adah Almutairi
    • Macromolecules, vol 44(21), pp. 8590-8597
  • UV and near-IR triggered release from polymeric nanoparticles

    Fomina, N. et al. (2010)

    UV and near-IR triggered release from polymeric nanoparticles
    • Nadezda Fomina, Cathryn McFearin, Marleen Sermsakdi, Osayimwense Edigin, Adah Almutairi
    • Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 132(28), pp.9540-9542
  • Synthesis and Characterization of Macrocyclic Poly (fluorene-3, 6-diyl)

    Fomina, N. et al. (2008)

    Synthesis and Characterization of Macrocyclic Poly (fluorene-3, 6-diyl)
    • Nadezda Fomina, Thieo E Hogen-Esch
    • Macromolecules, vol 41(11), pp. 3765-3768

Interview

Nadezda Fomina

Nadezda Fomina

Lead Scientist in Bioelectronics Group

Please tell us what fascinates you most about research.

I enjoy working in a research environment every single day. It is like solving puzzles, and I love puzzles. Together with my team, we generate and test new ideas, discuss data, find solutions to technical problems, and learn something new every day through this process.

Nadezda Fomina

Nadezda Fomina

Lead Scientist in Bioelectronics Group

What makes research done at Bosch so special?

At Bosch, we have access to competencies in core engineering fields such as sensors, actuators, and even packaging, which can be leveraged for medical device development. Access to medical experts through Bosch Hospital ensures that we only pursue those ideas which are truly needed in the medical field and will be adopted and used by doctors.

Nadezda Fomina

Nadezda Fomina

Lead Scientist in Bioelectronics Group

What research topics are you currently working on at Bosch?

Our group's research is focused on combining biology and electronics in order to improve medical diagnostics. Quantitative, low-cost detection of biomolecules with improved selectivity and specificity is a major need in healthcare. We take advantage of the sophisticated control routines and advanced data processing algorithms that are commonplace in electronics and bring those benefits into the highly-complex environment of DNA and protein measurements in order to provide more accurate and faster test results to doctors and patients.

Nadezda Fomina

Nadezda Fomina

Lead Scientist in Bioelectronics Group

What are the biggest scientific challenges in your field of research?

The biggest challenge in medical diagnostics is automation. Automation has the potential to dramatically reduce the cost of diagnostic tests, as well as to significantly improve their accuracy and reproducibility, which will ultimately improve patients' outcomes.

Nadezda Fomina

Nadezda Fomina

Lead Scientist in Bioelectronics Group

How do the results of your research become part of solutions "Invented for life"?

We strive to develop robust, state-of-the-art engineering solutions with the aim of improving people's health.

Nadezda Fomina

Get in touch with me

Nadezda Fomina
Lead Scientist in Bioelectronics Group
E-mail

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