Our research experts

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Quantum Technologies

"What is never acceptable – and what we must refrain from doing – is an attempt to justify the research by promising credibility-stretching mythical improvements in existing applications. Most such claims are not likely to be realized and are easily refuted; they only trigger criticism of just how unrealistic the promises are, thereby discrediting the whole work." – H. Kroemer, Nobel Prize speech (2000)

Dr. Thomas Strohm

I am a senior research scientist at Bosch Research in Renningen for Quantum Technologies and coordinating Quantum Technologies at Bosch. My focus areas are Quantum Computing and Quantum Random Number Generators and I'm very much interested in the foundations of quantum physics and in modeling quantum systems. Quantum Technologies is a research activity which is still in an early phase and, therefore, cooperation with the academic community and public funding initiatives is important. For this reason, I am very active in the European Quantum Flagship, as a member of its Coordination Office and as a representative of German industry in its European Quantum Community Network.

Curriculum vitae

Robert Bosch GmbH

1999
Start at Bosch Research

Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research

1999
PhD in physics

University of Karlsruhe

1994
Degree in physics

Selected publications

  • Talk on Quantum sensors and panel discussion at Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau

    T Strohm (2019)

    Talk on Quantum sensors and panel discussion at Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau
    • June 2019
  • Quantencomputing und andere Quantentechnologien

    T Strohm, R Rölver (2018)

    Quantencomputing und andere Quantentechnologien
    • Digitale Welt 2 (4), 71-76
  • Panel discussion on "Getting Quantum Computing to large Enterprise Users" at "Quantum Leap: Final Agenda"

    T Strohm (2017)

    Panel discussion on "Getting Quantum Computing to large Enterprise Users" at "Quantum Leap: Final Agenda"
    • Munich, June 22, 2017
  • Promotion of Quantum Technologies – Position paper of the German Industry

    M Förtsch et al. (2017)

    Promotion of Quantum Technologies – Position paper of the German Industry
    • BMBF, VDI TZ, Jan 2017
  • Quantum Manifesto – A New Era of Technology

    A de Touzalin et al. (2016)

    Quantum Manifesto – A New Era of Technology
    • European Commission, May 2016
  • Information reconciliation schemes in physical-layer security: A survey

    C Huth et al. (2016)

    Information reconciliation schemes in physical-layer security: A survey
    • Computer Networks 109, 84-104

Interview

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Senior Research Scientist for Quantum Technologies

Please tell us what fascinates you most about research.

What fascinates me about research? Solving difficult challenges, learning about our world, and understanding it.

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Senior Research Scientist for Quantum Technologies

What makes research done at Bosch so special?

I like that at Bosch Research, it is also possible to research topics which still need some years to become part of a product or a service. The diversity of competences displayed by Bosch researchers is fascinating. If you face a challenge, you are likely to find someone at Bosch Research who may help you.

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Senior Research Scientist for Quantum Technologies

What research topics are you currently working on at Bosch?

My research focus is on two topics. The first is quantum computers. We are investigating use cases that are relevant for Bosch and where the use of a quantum computer would be beneficial, basically meaning that it would be (much) faster. The second is quantum random number generators. Here, we are a partner to a European project (QRANGE), where three types of quantum random number generators are developed. My tasks are requirements and architecture development, making proposals for certification, and modeling the devices.

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Senior Research Scientist for Quantum Technologies

What are the biggest scientific challenges in your field of research?

In quantum computing, there are several major scientific challenges. Quantum computers are notoriously hard to build. Many academic groups have been working in this field for years and different technology platforms have been tried out. Advances have been made but it is still not obvious that in one or two decades we will have a decent quantum computer. Once we have a quantum computer, what will we do with it? This is the other challenge. Apart from materials development, which most experts consider possible already with first and non-perfect quantum computers, applications are still scarce and for many mathematical tasks, a quantum computer does not perform much better than a conventional computer.

For quantum random number generators, it is quite a challenge to miniaturize them and push costs considerably down without jeopardizing the quality of the random numbers. Developing a good quantum-physical model for a particular type of quantum random number generator may also be difficult.

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Senior Research Scientist for Quantum Technologies

How do the results of your research become part of solutions "Invented for life"?

"Invented for life" means that a technology helps you with your day-to-day problems. A quantum computer via better materials may lead to improved products. It can also be the basis for new services, e.g. better traffic management. And a quantum random number generator may be a contribution to a higher security level in our increasingly connected world.

Dr. Thomas Strohm

Get in touch with me

Dr. Thomas Strohm
Senior Research Scientist for Quantum Technologies
E-mail

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